25HP-55HP compact 4WD tractors powered with fuel-efficient engines, showcasing superior performance and maneuverability in addition to lower emissions, noise and vibration. Available in various chassis sizes, these tractors are tailored to landowners, small farmers (typically 30 acres or less) and commercial users. Each model includes more standard features and boasts superior performance at a lower price than the competition.

The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
Unlike in a conventional front loader, the lift arms in these machines are alongside the driver with the pivot points behind the driver's shoulders. Because of the operator's proximity to moving booms, early skid loaders were not as safe as conventional front loaders, particularly during entry and exit of the operator. Modern skid loaders have fully enclosed cabs and other features to protect the operator. Like other front loaders, it can push material from one location to another, carry material in its bucket or load material into a truck or trailer.
The original skid-steer loader arms were designed using a hinge at the rear of the machine to pivot the loader arm up into the air in an arc that swings up over the top of the operator. This design tends to limit the usable height to how long the loader arm is and the height of that pivot point. In the raised position the front of the loader arm moves towards the rear of the machine, requiring the operator to move extremely close to or press up against the side of a tall container or other transport vehicle to get the bucket close enough to dump accurately. At the highest arm positions the bucket may overflow the rear of the bucket and spill directly onto the top of the machine's cab.
2009 Caterpillar MT755B Tracked Tractor, 4,588.7 Hrs Showing, 290 Hp, Diesel, Water Cooled Engine, Hydrostatic, 16 Forward Speeds, Large 1000 PTO, Small 1000 PTO, Hydraulic Brakes, Heater, AC, Radio, Pin Hitch, 20 Weights, 118 Fuel Capacity, Tracked, 4 Reverse Speeds, Air Ride Drivers Seat, Buddy Seat, Bent First Step, 3 Point Hitch, Rear Quick Hitch, SN: 1754 ...more

No over-digging. No undercutting. No wasted time, fuel or dollars. SiteControl helps eliminate rework by making reliable, repeatable precision a reality. CASE offers tailor-made hardware and software solutions for all positioning and measuring tasks in construction, including ways for businesses to improve productivity and lower costs – both on and off your machine.


On the end of the stick is usually a bucket. A wide, large capacity (mud) bucket with a straight cutting edge is used for cleanup and levelling or where the material to be dug is soft, and teeth are not required. A general purpose (GP) bucket is generally smaller, stronger, and has hardened side cutters and teeth used to break through hard ground and rocks. Buckets have numerous shapes and sizes for various applications. There are also many other attachments which are available to be attached to the excavator for boring, ripping, crushing, cutting, lifting, etc. Excavators in Scandinavia often feature a tiltrotator which allows attachments rotate 360 degrees and tilt +/- 45 degrees, in order to increase the flexibility and precision of the excavator.
Can you dig it? Add an excavator to your repertoire and you have the hydraulic-powered muscle to tackle an incredible range of tasks. These powerful machines, manufactured by the likes of Caterpillar and Bobcat, make short work of trench-digging and forestry work, and by shopping the huge inventory on eBay you have the opportunity to pick a make and model that fits your requirements and budget.
1979 International 1086 2WD Tractor W/ Loader, 3,125 Hrs Showing, IH 415CI/6.8L Turbo Diesel, 8-Speed Transmission, Factory No TA, 540/1000 PTO, CAT III 3-Point Hitch, 3 Remotes, IH 2350 Loader With 7' Grapple Bucket, Wiring Harness Installed (Unknown Implement), AM/FM Cassette Stereo, NOTE: Some Grapple Forks Bent (See Pictures), SN: 2610181U39124 ...more
For more than six decades, TYM has been entrenched in the global agricultural marketplace. Our experience has honed our expertise, enabling us to build tractors at the utmost level of quality. In 2004, we introduced the first line of compact tractors into the western region of the U.S. Customers quickly recognized the quality and value of our machines. This success prompted us to expand distribution into the eastern U.S., as well as Canada.

Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]


I bought my Kubota L3750 in August 2016, at Empire Farm Days. It’s the largest agricultural trade show in the Northeast. This happens to be an hour or so from our new homestead and start-up chicken farm in upstate New York. We had owned our property almost a year, and soon as we moved in I starting thinking about tractors. My aim was something big enough to manage food plots, handle firewood, and clear brush. In the L3750 I have that, and I hope what I learned along the way can help other greenhorn farmers and homesteaders make that first tractor purchase.
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