If your personal piece of heaven is between one and five acres, your plans can quickly outgrow the capabilities of ordinary yard tractors or lawn and garden tractors. When you need to haul dirt and mulch, mow acres of grass, till a garden or plow snow, a versatile Boomer™ 24 compact tractor can power all the implements you'll need and more. The Boomer 24 is a small tractor, but it can accomplish big things, making it the best compact tractor for the money.
A zero-turn lawn mower is a riding mower that has a zero-turn radius--meaning it spins as opposed to turning like a standard vehicle with front-wheel turning. Basically, these things can turn on a dime. Instead of a steering wheel, most models have levers to control speed to each drive wheel, using a hydraulic-based system. They are considered faster and more efficient than standard riding lawn mowers. Because of this unique feature, they can be more expensive.

An excavator is designed to do one thing well - to dig out trenches, footings, and foundations with ease. Excavators are available in a variety of sizes, from the micro-excavator units that are adept at navigating tight urban or residential areas, to the massive earth-moving units that can scoop thousands of pounds of material in one pass. With the popularity of excavators at an all time high, it pays to understand the differences between competing models. Then, you can make an educated choice on a model that will serve your crew the best.
One solution does not fit all. CASE carefully considered each machine’s application, life expectancy, maintenance needs and operators. That’s why every CASE skid steer loader features a proven Tier 4 Final solution that is tailored for that model. CASE Tier 4-certified equipment is easier to maintain and, unlike competitive models, won't require you to master additional maintenance procedures. In fact, most CASE machines have maintenance-free emission solutions, so you can stay focused on your work—and not maintaining your machine.

Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]


For those seeking a micro-excavator for urban or residential work, the Bobcat 325G track excavator offers the ability to perform excavation work in tight areas. Powered by a 27.7 horsepower Kubota diesel motor, the 325G is biased toward smaller excavation work like irrigation trenching, digging out smaller pools, and excavating pads for small structures.

Who likes dropping or spilling materials? No one. That’s why CASE’s innovative Ride Control™ feature is such a benefit. Just push a button to automatically steady the loader arm when traveling at elevated speeds and the machine automatically compensates with greater shock absorption and reduced loader arm bounce, so you can work faster than ever without spilling your load.
I called my pal, Kyle, who runs Van Galder Family Farms in Alpine, New York, and my friend and mechanic Bill Phelps, of Phelps Auto in Lansing, New York. I told them what I was up to and they gave me a punch list of things to look at. Kyle, I found out, would be at the auction and could kick tires with me. That night before the auction, I typed out the accompanying checklist of things to look at before the bidding started.
Fifty-five farmers and assorted country folk clustered around the auctioneer. Bidding on the New Holland was fast and fierce. Then, the Kubota was up. “$15,000, can I get $15,000,” the auctioneer sang through a megaphone. “How about 10? Can I get 10? $10,000?” My buddy Kyle had told me never to bid first. They always start high, so wait for the drop and let someone else kick it off. “Nice Kubota, backhoe, good machine, how about 7, can I get 7?” A card went up. A guy in overalls near the front had bid. “We have 7, how about 7-5, 7-5.” Shaking like baby deer, I raised my card. “7-5, in the back. Can I get 8, 8, 8?” Overalls raised his card. “8-5, 8-5.”
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