An extended reach design uses multiple hinges and parallel lifting bars on the loader arm, with the main pivot points towards the center or front of the machine. This allows the loader arm to have much greater operating height while retaining a compact design, and allows the vertical movement to be less of an arc and more straight-up vertical, to keep the bucket forward of the operator's cab, allowing safe dumping into tall containers or vehicles.
If you are looking for a used skid steer for sale, these are the major manufacturer names you will come across: ASV, BELLE, BOBCAT, CASE, CATERPILLAR, CONMIX, COUGAR, DAEWOO, DINGO, DITCH WITCH, DOOSAN, DOZCO, ERMOTEC, FIAT-HITACHI, FORWAY, GAMZEN, GEHL, HYDRA MAC, HYDROTEK, HYUNDAI, IHIMER, INGERSOLL RAND, JCB, JICO, JOHN DEERE, JUNLIAN, KOMATSU, KUBOTA, LIFTMAK UDYOG, LIUGONG, MASSEY FERGUSON, MELROE, MESSERSI, MUSTANG, NEW HOLLAND, PRIDE OF INDIA, RACOON, SCAT TRACK, SHERPA, SKYTRAK, SPACK, SUNDARAM, SUNWARD, SUSUMO, TAKEUCHI, TCM, TEREX, THOMAS, TORO, TOYOTA, VERMEER, VOLVO, WACKER NEUSON, YANMAR. With such a wide selection of used skid steer loaders to choose from, you are guaranteed to find the one that is right for you and your business.
The wheels on a skid steer typically have no steering mechanism, they are in a fixed, straight line relative to the body of the machine.  By turning the left and right wheel pairs at different speeds, the machine turns by skidding, or dragging its wheels across the ground.  The rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine.  This skidding motion tears up the ground on which the machine operates.
The first three-wheeled, front-end loader was invented by brothers Cyril and Louis Keller in Rothsay, Minnesota, in 1957.[2] The Kellers built the loader to help a farmer, Eddie Velo, mechanize the process of cleaning turkey manure from his barn. The light and compact machine, with its rear caster wheel, was able to turn around within its own length, while performing the same tasks as a conventional front-end loader.[2]
Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]
Fifty-five farmers and assorted country folk clustered around the auctioneer. Bidding on the New Holland was fast and fierce. Then, the Kubota was up. “$15,000, can I get $15,000,” the auctioneer sang through a megaphone. “How about 10? Can I get 10? $10,000?” My buddy Kyle had told me never to bid first. They always start high, so wait for the drop and let someone else kick it off. “Nice Kubota, backhoe, good machine, how about 7, can I get 7?” A card went up. A guy in overalls near the front had bid. “We have 7, how about 7-5, 7-5.” Shaking like baby deer, I raised my card. “7-5, in the back. Can I get 8, 8, 8?” Overalls raised his card. “8-5, 8-5.”
Operate the skid steer loader the way you like through the simple touch of a button on our EZ-EH controls. Quickly switch between personalized settings for speed and control customization; program up to nine different presets to recall operator settings for different jobs and different operators at the touch of a button. There’s also an intuitive lockout menu and rocker switch to easily alternate between CASE “H” and “ISO” patterns.
A tractor is a large, heavy duty vehicle with a petrol or diesel motor delivering high torque at a low speed. Tractors are especially indispensable in the world of agriculture, as they can tow implement or machine attachments used for ploughing, tilling, harrowing, planting and feeding, as well as spraying fertilizers and pesticides. Another popular attachment is the hey tedder that allows haymaking. Tractors also have the power to haul large items, and the heavy treads of their rear tyres allow plenty of traction on soft or uneven terrain. The more modern RC tractors can be controlled remotely and some are used to mow like a tractor mower.
Unlike in a conventional front loader, the lift arms in these machines are alongside the driver with the pivot points behind the driver's shoulders. Because of the operator's proximity to moving booms, early skid loaders were not as safe as conventional front loaders, particularly during entry and exit of the operator. Modern skid loaders have fully enclosed cabs and other features to protect the operator. Like other front loaders, it can push material from one location to another, carry material in its bucket or load material into a truck or trailer.
Fifty-five farmers and assorted country folk clustered around the auctioneer. Bidding on the New Holland was fast and fierce. Then, the Kubota was up. “$15,000, can I get $15,000,” the auctioneer sang through a megaphone. “How about 10? Can I get 10? $10,000?” My buddy Kyle had told me never to bid first. They always start high, so wait for the drop and let someone else kick it off. “Nice Kubota, backhoe, good machine, how about 7, can I get 7?” A card went up. A guy in overalls near the front had bid. “We have 7, how about 7-5, 7-5.” Shaking like baby deer, I raised my card. “7-5, in the back. Can I get 8, 8, 8?” Overalls raised his card. “8-5, 8-5.”
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