The wheels on a skid steer typically have no steering mechanism, they are in a fixed, straight line relative to the body of the machine.  By turning the left and right wheel pairs at different speeds, the machine turns by skidding, or dragging its wheels across the ground.  The rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine.  This skidding motion tears up the ground on which the machine operates.

The conventional bucket of many skid loaders can be replaced with a variety of specialized buckets or attachments, many powered by the loader's hydraulic system. These include backhoe, hydraulic breaker, pallet forks, angle broom, sweeper, auger, mower, snow blower, stump grinder, tree spade, trencher, dumping hopper, pavement miller, ripper, tillers, grapple, tilt, roller, snow blade, wheel saw, cement mixer, and wood chipper machine.
A skid-steer loader can sometimes be used in place of a large excavator by digging a hole from the inside. The skid loader first digs a ramp leading to the edge of the desired excavation. It then uses the ramp to carry material out of the hole. The skid loader reshapes the ramp making it steeper and longer as the excavation deepens. This method is particularly useful for digging under a structure where overhead clearance does not allow for the boom of a large excavator, such as digging a basement under an existing house. Several companies make backhoe attachments for skid-steers. These are more effective for digging in a small area than the method above and can work in the same environments. Other applications may consist of transporting raw material around a job site, or assisting in the rough grading process.

The first three-wheeled, front-end loader was invented by brothers Cyril and Louis Keller in Rothsay, Minnesota, in 1957.[2] The Kellers built the loader to help a farmer, Eddie Velo, mechanize the process of cleaning turkey manure from his barn. The light and compact machine, with its rear caster wheel, was able to turn around within its own length, while performing the same tasks as a conventional front-end loader.[2]


La comodidad y la facilidad de operación han sido los principales criterios de diseño en cada aspecto de la estación del operador. El interior amplio y espacioso, y el piso libre de obstáculos, proporcionan un entorno de trabajo cómodo, con excelente espacio para la cabeza, los hombros y las piernas, lo que permite mantener la productividad al máximo y la fatiga al mínimo. El asiento ajustable y los controles de bajo esfuerzo mantienen al operador cómodo durante toda la jornada de trabajo.
"Knowing the specific applications the customer would like to perform will help a rental business determine the size and power of machine needed to most efficiently complete the tasks," says Rostberg. "Asking questions and getting to the core of the customer's work will help determine this. Also, while inquiring about the customer's needs, a rental business might discover opportunities to rent attachments that will help the customer more quickly and efficiently complete their job."
recambio / repuesto / pieza original para maquinaria de obras públicas y construcción, de las marcas Furukawa (cargadoras, excavadoras y martillos), cargadoras Kawasaki, moto niveladora Mitsubishi, miniexcavadoras Hanix, martillos Konan MKB y Komac, Caterpillar, Komatsu, Frd , cargadoras y retrocargadoras Palazzani, martillos Montabert y Npk, bombas japonesas nachi y kawasaki, minicargadoras y miniexcavadoras Bobcat
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