Who likes dropping or spilling materials? No one. That’s why CASE’s innovative Ride Control™ feature is such a benefit. Just push a button to automatically steady the loader arm when traveling at elevated speeds and the machine automatically compensates with greater shock absorption and reduced loader arm bounce, so you can work faster than ever without spilling your load.
Applications that require the extra horsepower, such as dozing work, are also a good fit for large skid-steer loaders. "Basically, the large-frame skid steers are going to do the heavy lifting for a contractor," says Zupancic. "When they need a big machine to do the hard work on a big site, but they still need maximum manueverablity and versatility, they'll turn to a large skid steer."
"Knowing the specific applications the customer would like to perform will help a rental business determine the size and power of machine needed to most efficiently complete the tasks," says Rostberg. "Asking questions and getting to the core of the customer's work will help determine this. Also, while inquiring about the customer's needs, a rental business might discover opportunities to rent attachments that will help the customer more quickly and efficiently complete their job."
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
Some of the biggest names in the world produce skid steer loaders, including Bobcat, New Holland and Kubota. Consider a Boxer mini skid for domestic and small-scale applications, or invest in a powerful John Deere or Caterpillar loader for commercial use.  Even if you choose to buy a second-hand machine, you have the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have bought something built to last.
Operate the skid steer loader the way you like through the simple touch of a button on our EZ-EH controls. Quickly switch between personalized settings for speed and control customization; program up to nine different presets to recall operator settings for different jobs and different operators at the touch of a button. There’s also an intuitive lockout menu and rocker switch to easily alternate between CASE “H” and “ISO” patterns.

Skid steer loaders, the "Swiss Army Knives" of machines, use a wide range of mechanical and hydraulically powered attachments to accomplish varied tasks. Skid loaders, having sophisticated auxiliary hydraulic systems, are compact, highly maneuverable, and range in rated operating capacity (the weight that can be safely lifted and transported) from 500 to more than 4,000 pounds.
Skid-steer loaders are typically four-wheel vehicles with the wheels mechanically locked in synchronization on each side, and where the left-side drive wheels can be driven independently of the right-side drive wheels. The wheels typically have no separate steering mechanism and hold a fixed straight alignment on the body of the machine. Turning is accomplished by differential steering, in which the left and right wheel pairs are operated at different speeds, and the machine turns by skidding or dragging its fixed-orientation wheels across the ground. The extremely rigid frame and strong wheel bearings prevent the torsional forces caused by this dragging motion from damaging the machine. As with tracked vehicles, the high ground friction produced by skid steers can rip up soft or fragile road surfaces. They can be converted to low ground friction by using specially designed wheels such as the Mecanum wheel. Skid-steer loaders are capable of zero-radius, "pirouette" turning, which makes them extremely maneuverable and valuable for applications that require a compact, agile loader. Skid-steer loaders are sometimes equipped with tracks instead of the wheels, and such a vehicle is known as a multi-terrain loader.[1]
recambio / repuesto / pieza original para maquinaria de obras públicas y construcción, de las marcas Furukawa (cargadoras, excavadoras y martillos), cargadoras Kawasaki, moto niveladora Mitsubishi, miniexcavadoras Hanix, martillos Konan MKB y Komac, Caterpillar, Komatsu, Frd , cargadoras y retrocargadoras Palazzani, martillos Montabert y Npk, bombas japonesas nachi y kawasaki, minicargadoras y miniexcavadoras Bobcat
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