used john deere tractors

IVT, ILS, Front Duals, Prem Cab, Active Seat, 7" Color TouchScreen, Michelin 480R50 Rear, Michelin 420R34 Front, 5 Hyd, Big Hyd Pump (60GPM), 18300# 3 Point, HID Lights, Front Fenders, Rear Fender Ext, Cat 4 Drawbar (No HD Sppt), 1000 PTO, 1 Pr 1400# Rear Wgts, 8 Front Wgts, XM Radio, Leather, Radar, Biz Band Ant, Cold Weather Pkg.|Front Weight Support with 8 Front Suitcase Weights and One Pair of 635 kg (1400 lb.)|Cold Weather Start Kit|Auxiliary Hydraulic Connections|John Deere PowerTech PSX 9.0 L (549 cu. In.) 6 Cyl IT4 / Stage 3b Compliant Diesel Engine|Foot Operated Speed Control|Antenna Mount and Wiring for Business Band (2-Way) Radio|Radar, Dual Beam Sensor|Leather Trim Package|Fenders, Full Coverage Rear 2.55 m (100 In.) Width|Fenders, Deluxe Pivoting Front for MFWD or ILS -480 mm (18.9 In.) Wide|480/70R34 In. 146A8 R1W Radial in Dual Wheel Configuration|Premium Lighting|John Deere Independent Link Suspension with Hydraulic Differential Lock, Fully Enclosed Driveline and Dual Tyre Capabili|480/80R50 In. 159A8 R1W Radial in Dual Wheel Configuration|120 mm (4.72 In.) Diameter x 3010 mm (118.5 In.) Length with Double Taper Wheel Hubs|Cat. 4 Adjustable Swinging Drawbar with 50 mm (2 In.) Pin with Heavy Duty Support|8,482 kg (18,700 Lb.) Lift Capacity Hitch (Cat 4N/3) Hitch with Sway Blocks and Quick Coupler|45 mm (1-3/4 In.) 1000 rpm PTO (20 Spline)|Five Remote Selective Control Valves with Push/Pull Breakaway Couplers and High Pressure Relief Levers|227.1 lpm (60 gpm) 85 cc Hydraulic Pump Displacement|Premium Radio Package with XM Radio|Premium CommandView II Cab with Active Seat|Touchscreen GS3 CommandCenter 7 Color Display, Video Capable|AutoPowr IVT Transmission 42 km/h (26 mph) with Right Hand Reverser Controls ...more
The Melroe brothers, of Melroe Manufacturing Company in Gwinner, North Dakota, purchased the rights to the Keller loader in 1958 and hired the Kellers to continue refining their invention. As a result of this partnership, the M-200 Melroe self-propelled loader was introduced at the end of 1958. It featured two independent front-drive wheels and a rear caster wheel, a 12.9 hp (9.6 kW) engine and a 750-pound (340 kg) lift capacity. Two years later they replaced the caster wheel with a rear axle and introduced the M-400, the first four-wheel, true skid-steer loader.[2] The M-440 was powered by a 15.5 hp (11.6 kW) engine and had an 1,100-pound (500 kg) rated operating capacity. Skid-steer development continued into the mid-1960s with the M600 loader.
Every Certified Pre-Owned Tractor, Combine and now Self-Propelled Sprayer is covered by a comprehensive PowerGard™ plan, giving you the coverage benefits of new with the extra value of pre-owned. Right now, no one else offers a low-hour machine that’s been field tested, inspected and certified on over 170 points for tractors and 200 points on combines and sprayers. Add to that a free one-year JDLink™ Connect subscription, and a John Deere Certified Pre-Owned machine deserves even more of your attention.
Hydraulic excavator capabilities have expanded far beyond excavation tasks with buckets. With the advent of hydraulic-powered attachments such as a breaker, a grapple or an auger, the excavator is frequently used in many applications other than excavation. Many excavators feature a quick coupler for simplified attachment mounting, increasing the machine's utilization on the jobsite. Excavators are usually employed together with loaders and bulldozers. Most wheeled, compact and some medium-sized (11 to 18-tonne) excavators have a backfill (or dozer) blade. This is a horizontal bulldozer-like blade attached to the undercarriage and is used for levelling and pushing removed material back into a hole.
On the end of the stick is usually a bucket. A wide, large capacity (mud) bucket with a straight cutting edge is used for cleanup and levelling or where the material to be dug is soft, and teeth are not required. A general purpose (GP) bucket is generally smaller, stronger, and has hardened side cutters and teeth used to break through hard ground and rocks. Buckets have numerous shapes and sizes for various applications. There are also many other attachments which are available to be attached to the excavator for boring, ripping, crushing, cutting, lifting, etc. Excavators in Scandinavia often feature a tiltrotator which allows attachments rotate 360 degrees and tilt +/- 45 degrees, in order to increase the flexibility and precision of the excavator.

Hydraulic excavator capabilities have expanded far beyond excavation tasks with buckets. With the advent of hydraulic-powered attachments such as a breaker, a grapple or an auger, the excavator is frequently used in many applications other than excavation. Many excavators feature a quick coupler for simplified attachment mounting, increasing the machine's utilization on the jobsite. Excavators are usually employed together with loaders and bulldozers. Most wheeled, compact and some medium-sized (11 to 18-tonne) excavators have a backfill (or dozer) blade. This is a horizontal bulldozer-like blade attached to the undercarriage and is used for levelling and pushing removed material back into a hole.
For a standard household lawn mower under normal conditions, it is recommended to sharpen the blades twice a mowing season. It’s important to keep the blades sharp as they cut grass faster and cleaner, and this cleaner cut promotes faster lawn regrowth. If you notice decreased performance, uneven cutting patterns, or it is taking longer to mow your lawn, it might be time to check the blade. Take the mower to a certified blade sharpener.
* As of June 1, 2018, applies to purchases of new John Deere skid steers, compact track loaders, compact excavators, and compact wheel loaders from John Deere or authorized John Deere dealers. Warranty expires two years after the delivery receipt date or after 2,000 machine hours, whichever occurs first. Offer valid at participating dealers only. Some restrictions may apply. See your dealer for complete details.
With my ideal tractor in mind, I was able to cut the list of 60 or 70 tractors for sale down to 20 or so. Before I got into seeing what those 20 fetched online, I dug into tractor forums looking for hands-on reviews. The New Hollands in the size class I was after, I found, were actually rebranded LS tractors, made in South Korea. A neighbor loaned me an LS awhile back and I wasn’t in love with it. The old Allis-Chalmers was a great machine, but parts were hard to find. A couple of the John Deeres had really positive chatter, as did the L3750, which a couple of guys on the Kubota forum said might be the best tractor Big Orange ever made. Before I started pricing the tractors out, that list of 20 or so was cut in half.

Fifty-five farmers and assorted country folk clustered around the auctioneer. Bidding on the New Holland was fast and fierce. Then, the Kubota was up. “$15,000, can I get $15,000,” the auctioneer sang through a megaphone. “How about 10? Can I get 10? $10,000?” My buddy Kyle had told me never to bid first. They always start high, so wait for the drop and let someone else kick it off. “Nice Kubota, backhoe, good machine, how about 7, can I get 7?” A card went up. A guy in overalls near the front had bid. “We have 7, how about 7-5, 7-5.” Shaking like baby deer, I raised my card. “7-5, in the back. Can I get 8, 8, 8?” Overalls raised his card. “8-5, 8-5.”
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